Sunday, June 13, 2021

The 2020 Water Quality Report is Now Available

The 2020 Water Quality Report will arrive at  your doorstep soon. The report takes a deep dive into the quality of water in Southlake.

“The City of Southlake’s goal is to provide a safe and a better quality of life to our residents in all areas, and water is no different,” Environmental Services Coordinator Ashley Carlisle said. “We are proud of the high standards of drinking water the City has set and are proud to send out water quality reports to show how we’re meeting the high standards set out for us.”

The report provides information about Southlake drinking water such as where the water comes from, whether the water is safe and what contaminants might be in the water.

Water samples were provided to the Environmental Protection Agency for analysis. The United States currently monitors 100 contaminants within the water supply and 91 must meet regulations to determine water safety and quality.

The report also highlights information about how to properly dispose of medicines, paint, pesticides, cleaning products and cooking oil through a partnership program with the Fort Worth Environmental Collections Center as well as resources available through the City of Southlake.

To help track your water usage, residents can download the EyeOnWater app, which provides 24/7 access to view water consumption. The City also offers a W.I.S.E. Guys program to help identify leaks in irrigation systems and the F.O.G. program, which provides information on fats, oils and grease build up in drains.

The water quality report is available to view online here. For questions about the water quality report, please contact Southlake Public Works at 817-748-8082.

 

Imagine A Day Without Water: Southlake Streets & Drainage

Could you imagine a day without water? No water to drink, no water to shower, flush the toilet, or do laundry, or even make a latte with.

Southlake Water Utilities has partnered with The Value of Water Coalition to promote awareness of our most valuable natural resource. The coalition’s sponsored event Imagine a Day Without Water is on September 15.

Not having a source of clean, reliable water would cause a significant disruption in our daily lives, and many of us also would not be able to do our jobs. We recently asked fellow Southlake employees: How would a day without water affect your ability to provide reliable services to the City of Southlake?

“It took 40 yards of concrete to complete this 230 feet of sidewalk,” said Joe Walsh, Streets and Drainage Supervisor for the City of Southlake. The new sidewalk along the north side of Continental Boulevard, east of the intersection at Breeze Way was identified as important to Southlake residents for improving mobility. “Without the 1,360 gallons of accessible water to wet the concrete, we would not have been able to build this sidewalk.”

“It is easy to take for granted when you are not thinking about it, but clean, accessible water is incredibly important to my crew’s job every day.” The Streets Division uses water to keep dust down while sweeping streets, to clean up work sites, and to keep the team hydrated.

Stay tuned for more stories on how the City of Southlake values water.

Share your thoughts! How would a day without water affect you and your family?

 

Imagine A Day Without Water: Southlake Fire Fighters

Could you imagine a day without water? No water to drink, no water to shower, flush the toilet, do laundry, or even to make a latte with.

Southlake Water Utilities has partnered with The Value of Water Coalition to promote awareness of our most valuable natural resource. The coalition’s sponsored event, Imagine a Day Without Water is on September 15.

As well as causing significant disruption to our daily lives, many of us also could not do our job without a source of clean, reliable water. We recently asked fellow Southlake employees, “How would a day without water affect your ability to provide reliable services to the City of Southlake?”

“At an average structure fire, the Fire Department requires between 500 and 2000 gallons a minute,” according to Kelly Clements, Deputy Chief/Fire Marshal for the City of Southlake. Because the combined tank capacity on all of the fire apparatus is 1800 gallons, without a connection to a fire hydrant the Fire Department would be without water in one to three minutes!

“The importance of water is paramount in achieving the desired results for our fire department, and without it, we would all be high and dry,” says Clements.

Stay tuned for more stories on how the City of Southlake values water.

Share your thoughts! How would a day without water affect you and your family?

 

Measures to Maintain Water Quality Underway

You may have noticed the flushing of fire hydrants across the City over the last several weeks and wondered to yourself “what’s going on?”or “why is the City doing that?” In short, the purpose of the flushing is to maintain the quality of water during the winter months or periods of low consumption by ensuring that the water doesn’t stagnate or collect potentially harmful elements.

We aren’t alone in doing this. The City of Fort Worth recently sent out information regarding the flushing of their system as a preventative measure to maintain drinking water quality. In addition, a number of their 29 water customer cities (of which Southlake is one) are undertaking similar measures.

All in all, it’s a necessary practice to ensure the integrity of the City’s drinking water and, because of that, the City will continue to flush the hydrants as needed.

For questions and comments, please contact the Public Works Department Water Division at 817-748-8079 or utilize the Public Works “Contact the Director” form located here.

 

 

Pressure Regulating Valve Antenna Update

Top Row:  River Oaks Dr and Durham Elementary; Center: Southridge Lakes; Bottom Row:  Dove/Shady Oaks and Shady Oaks/Highland

Top Row: Fm 1709/River Oaks Dr (left), Durham Elementary (right); Center: Southridge Lakes; Bottom Row: Dove/Shady Oaks (left), Shady Oaks/Highland (right)

In late 2014, new Pressure Regulating Valves (PRVs)  were installed at five (5) locations around the City as part of the Southlake 2030 Water Master Plan.

This Tier 1 Southlake 2030 project aims to improve City water flow during firefighting emergencies by automatically detecting the changes in pressure between the high pressure and low pressure planes and electronically adjust the water flow to supplement the availability of water during a critical need situation.

Over the last few months, the Public Works Department has worked to complete this project and install five antennas at the PRV locations. The antennas allow for City staff to remotely monitor the PRVs  and adjust water flow needs in the event of an emergency.

After several months of working with contractors to design and build antennas that fit into the Southlake area, the antennas are now installed at their designated locations (see image). The final phase of this project is to connect the antenna to the City’s monitoring (SCADA) system.

For questions about this project, please contact Public Works engineer, Alex Ayala at 817-748-8274.